What’s the right order for the slides in your pitch deck?

There are a tonne of pitch deck templates out there, but most of them get one thing wrong: they forget to indicate that the template is (meant to be) adaptable.

Using the template as-is works for some firms, but for others, it results in a tale that doesn't flow, at best, or doesn't work, at worst.

For example, in this week's dissection of Encore's pitch deck (TechCrunch+ subscription required), the company starts with a team slide — bold, and it works for some organisations, but not for others.

The content in pitch decks is pretty much the same in broad strokes - that's kind of the goal, and it helps investors rapidly obtain a full picture of the firm they're investing in.

In broad strokes, pitch deck content is pretty much the same - that's kind of the goal, and it allows investors to rapidly get a full overview of the firm they're considering.

What’s the right You know the drill: what's the problem, how are you going to solve it, how big is the marketorder for the slides in your pitch deck?

 who's your rival, who's on your team, how much money are you raising... the usual. But how do you figure out what the appropriate order is if there isn't one?

I frequently come upon an odd dilemma while reviewing pitch decks, whether for TechCrunch, the numerous accelerators I work with, or as a pitch coach

If your Keynote or PowerPoint is stealing the show, you've already lost. To catch investors attention, your first slide should be something that surprises and delights.

So how do you fight the right order? Write the titles of your slides on Post-its or index cards, hand them to a friend who hasn’t heard the story of your company before, and just pitch your friend the way that feels the most natural. Ask your friend to keep track of what order you told the story,

who's your rival, who's on your team, how much money are you raising... the usual. But how do you figure out what the appropriate order is if there isn't one? . Many, if not all, of the people with whom I work haven't done so.